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January 2018 Archives

Understanding refugee quotas

Every year, people from all over the world looking to flee their countries of origin will often attempt to come to Louisville or other cities in the U.S. seeking asylum. Their reasons for wanting to leave their countries may vary; some may be trying to escape religious or ethnic persecution, while others may want to get their families out of areas involved in military conflicts. Whatever their motivations may be, these refugees have often viewed the United States as a safe haven. Officials in the U.S. have typically been willing to accept them, yet only to a certain point. 

What happens to my conditional status after a divorce?

The process to obtain your conditional status was long and arduous, and it may have interfered with your wedding plans on more than one occasion. However, once achieved, you and your new spouse began your new life in the United States. That may have included finding a job and perhaps having a child.

I am a permanent resident of the U.S. Do I need a reentry permit for travel?

If you are an immigrant living in Kentucky and are working toward legal citizenship, you may fall under the category of a lawful permanent resident of the U.S. Many would-be citizens have this status so they can live and work in the States as they wait for citizenship. If you plan to return to your homeland for an extended period of time, having a reentry permit ensures you can return to the U.S. without losing your status as a permanent resident.

Is the U.S. removing immigrant human rights violators?

Yes. The United States does have procedures in place whose purpose is to prevent entry by those who have committed atrocities against other humans or engaged in other human rights violations. It also has processes for removal should authorities learn that a person living in the United States was previously a violator. However, it can take many years for the process to play out and for the subject to avail him or herself of due process rights prior to removal. Immigration and Customs Enforcement recently reported on one such instance where a person who had lived legally in the United States was investigated and ultimately deported in early January, 2018 based on government findings of a serious nature.