John Vickerstaff Louisville, Kentucky Immigration Lawyer
This is an advertisement
call for an initial consultation
Toll Free888-832-2944
Practice Areas

Posts tagged "blog"

When the government comes knocking at your door after the wedding

Emigrating from another country to build a new life in Kentucky may be a dream you waited years to fulfill. As a newly married person as well, you're likely still going through an adjustment period as all newlyweds typically do. As a newly married immigrant, you may face certain challenges that U.S. citizens don't, such as overcoming a language barrier and getting used to new customs and cultural situations. Hopefully, your married life and residence in the United States will bring you lasting joy.

Changes to the Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition process

You would more than likely find it nearly impossible to find someone in the United States, let alone here in Kentucky, who isn't aware of the current upheaval in immigration law going on in this country. Numerous changes already exist regarding certain laws and procedures, and if you are not aware of them, you could end up on the wrong side of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services or U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

What happens to my conditional status after a divorce?

The process to obtain your conditional status was long and arduous, and it may have interfered with your wedding plans on more than one occasion. However, once achieved, you and your new spouse began your new life in the United States. That may have included finding a job and perhaps having a child.

What happens if I overstay my visa?

If you entered the United States through one of the dozens of temporary visa programs, you likely had a particular reason for coming to this country. Such visas cover professions such as athletes, religious workers, students, skilled laborers and those with extraordinary talent in a variety of industries. Because of the limited number of visas offered each year, you can consider yourself fortunate to have obtained your permit to come to Kentucky and work.

Has the government stoked an interest in your marriage?

If someone in Kentucky (or anywhere, for that matter) were to ask you why you married your spouse, you may have many different answers. Perhaps it was the way he or she made you feel comfortable, like you could be yourself and not worry about impressions. Maybe it was a great sense of humor, compassionate heart or strong work ethic that attracted you, or any combination of these or other attributes. What if an official immigration officer suspects that the only reason you got married was to obtain a green card?

What's the point of a points-based visa system?

As a prospective immigrant who wants to enter Kentucky or another location in the United States in the hope of securing a better life for yourself and your family, you're likely already aware that the process may be complicated and stressful. If you follow current event news, you may have also heard that the entire immigration process is undergoing an overhaul since the new presidential administration took office. A main topic of consideration has to do with the visa program.

Situations that may signify an abandonment of your legal status

You may have gone through a long, arduous process before securing permanent legal residence status in the United States. You definitely are not the first immigrant to have done so, and likely may know of others in your personal or professional life whose stories are similar to yours. Maintaining your status is undoubtedly a high priority if you plan on living somewhere in the nation for the rest of your life. U.S. immigration law often changes and if your knowledge isn't current, you may run into trouble.

Navigating the process of obtaining a K-1 visa

Getting engaged is an exciting time, but making plans for a wedding and a life together can be quite complicated if your fiancé does not live in the country. In addition to planning for everything that comes with a wedding, you must also apply for the appropriate visas if you intend for your fiancé to travel to the United States and reside with you here in Kentucky on a permanent basis.

Do you qualify for temporary protected status?

Immigration has been a hot topic in the United States, including here in Kentucky, for some time now. Refugees from certain war-torn or otherwise unsafe countries may find it difficult to enter the country at present. Those who are already here, however, may reach a point where their time in the country is ending.