John Vickerstaff Louisville, Kentucky Immigration Lawyer
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Posts tagged "Adjustment of Status"

I am a permanent resident of the U.S. Do I need a reentry permit for travel?

If you are an immigrant living in Kentucky and are working toward legal citizenship, you may fall under the category of a lawful permanent resident of the U.S. Many would-be citizens have this status so they can live and work in the States as they wait for citizenship. If you plan to return to your homeland for an extended period of time, having a reentry permit ensures you can return to the U.S. without losing your status as a permanent resident.

What is the diversity program and can I use it to get a visa?

Since it is a random drawing, whether you, residing in Kentucky, can secure a visa through this program will depend on more than just your diversity. The application process requires some planning and document gathering, as well as adhering to a deadline for the year in question.

I am an asylee -- am I eligible for a green card?

Those who live in Kentucky as an asylee, or a person who has been granted asylum in the United States, can eventually apply for permanent residency in the form of a green card after a year of living in the country. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, you must properly fill out and file the I-485 form to get the process started. This is the application to change your status and it can only be filed at a time in which you are physically in the country. That is not the only requirement you will need to meet, though. For starters, you must have been physically present for an entire year -- one or more -- in the time since you were granted asylum.

Determining visa availability

As you think about the process that prepared you to come to Louisville from your country of origin, you likely remember that one of the criteria to qualify for your visa was to have the intention of one day returning home. Yet like many of those that we here at the Vickerstaff Law Office, PSC have worked with, you may have come to view the U.S. as your new home. Now, as you get ready apply for an adjustment of status, one of the elements that you must consider is whether there is a visa available in your immigrant category. 

Reviewing the Immigration and Nationality Act

The United States has long been the preferred destination of millions from around the world seeking opportunities to better theirs and their families' circumstances. However, the immigration history of the U.S. has long been influenced by different policies and trends that have contributed to cultural makeup both in Louisville and the rest of the country. The federal government took significant steps to curb those influences by signing the Immigration and Nationality Act into law in 1965. 

Filing for adjustment of status

People who come to the United States may do so under many different types of visas and for many different types of reasons. Some foreign nationals in Kentucky are here to pursue specific educational or occupational opportunities. Others have come to the United States to join family members. Still others have fled their countries due to unpleasant circumstances they experienced at home.

What do I need to know about submitting a petition?

Submitting a petition in Kentucky and having it approved is one of the first steps toward being awarded an immigrant visa in the United States. If you are attempting to gain legal access into the country, there are several things you need to keep in mind. The U.S. Department of State details the factors that will affect whether or not your application is approved.

Immigration fears race through Kentucky Derby workers

This Saturday's Kentucky Derby could be the biggest sporting event of the year in Louisville, though fans of the Cardinals' basketball and football teams might well argue the point. Regardless, there is no doubt that the Derby is horse racing's premier event, commanding enormous audiences at the track and on TVs across the nation.